Month: August 2019

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Cosigning is ALWAYS a Bad Idea

We understand how hard it is to say no, especially to a friend or family member.  Let me say this loud and clear, when a family member of a friend asks about cosigning a loan for them, RUN FOR THE HILLS! JUST SAY NO! DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES SIGN THAT LOAN!

No matter how sure you are that they won’t default on the loan, you may even feel it in your soul, DON’T DO IT.  If a lender is asking for a cosigner, there’s a good reason. It’s because they believe that the primary borrower won’t be able to make their financial obligations.  More often than not, the lender is right.

When it comes to cosigning, you’re being asked to guarantee a debt.  If the primary borrower doesn’t repay the debt, you’re on the hook for the debt and the creditor WILL come after you. You’ll be on the hook for late fees, collection costs, attorneys fees and the principal balance of the loan.  If the debt goes into default it WILL show up on your credit report. The bottom line is, cosigning is always a bad idea.

Cosigning is always a bad idea.  Have I made myself clear up to this point? Cosigning a debt puts you in the worst possible situation.  You receive no benefit from the loan you’re cosigning. You aren’t getting a student loan to improve your education, you’re not getting a house to live in and build equity in, you’re not getting that flashy new car to ride around town in. You’re just on the hook for all of it.  You can have you bank accounts and assets seized, your paycheck garnished, you could be subject to litigation and you could ultimately end up in bankruptcy.

We understand that it’s difficult to refuse to help someone you love.  Telling friends or family members no is one of the toughest things you can do. However, it may be the best thing you can do for your relationship.  Think about what your relationship will be like if your friend or family member defaults on the loan or even just misses a payment. That’s going to show up on your credit at a minimum and will likely bring your score down 20 or more points.  The damage that cosigning can do to relationships can not be understated. You’ll be left with a loan and a relationship that will be severely damaged from here forward.

If you’ve cosigned a loan with someone who has missed payments or defaulted on a loan completely and you find yourself on the hook for their mistakes the attorneys at Harmon and Gorove can help.  We are experts in dealing with these kinds of issues through the bankruptcy code.  Contact us today for a free, no obligation consultation about how we can help you get out from under these debts and get your life back.

How to Recover from Bankruptcy

Dead end roads, dead end jobs, dead end relationships.  All these are good examples of things that can truly be a dead end.  Notice, however, how the word Bankruptcy was NEVER mentioned as a dead end.  Quite the contrary, Bankruptcy can be a fantastic new beginning that can give you a fresh perspective and fresh start on your road to financial success. Bankruptcy allows you the kind of fresh start you need after a run of bad luck or a series of bad decisions.  By using these mistakes and learning from your bad luck, you can have a great deal of success after bankruptcy. Below, I list how you can successfully recover after bankruptcy.

 

  1. First things first, you MUST learn from your mistakes and misfortunes.  It is important to identify what happened and what caused you to file bankruptcy in the first place.  Was it bad choice, a spate of ill health, a run of bad luck or just plain stupidity. The decision to file bankruptcy was hard enough and let’s be honest.  You probably don’t want to be back here again. In order to avoid this problem in the future, you’ve got to figure out how you got here in the first place.
  2. After you identify your mistakes the next thing you’ve got to do is to plan for the future.  You need to create a budget based on what you can ACTUALLY AFFORD based on your income. Making this budget and sticking to it will lead you to a lifetime of financial success and keep you out of our office in the future.
  3. Once you’ve made plans, the next thing you need to do is set some goals.  Where do you want to be in 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 5 years or a decade? You need to set goals and work them into your budget.  Such goals should include an emergency savings fund. An emergency cushion should be at least 6 months worth of your expenses in the event you have a job loss or experience medical problems in the future.  
  4. Once you’ve set up goals, you need to work on re-establishing your credit.  The only caveat to this is that it must be done SLOWLY AND DELIBERATELY. You can start out by rebuilding your credit slowly but getting a credit card and using it for a deliberate purpose.  Only buying certain things and ALWAYS paying it off at the beginning of the month. Over time this will allow your credit score to recover once you’ve shown your responsible and able to pay off your debts each month.  
  5. Finally, it’s always best to have a positive attitude.  Bankruptcy can be stressful (although we try our best to ease that stress) and cause a lost of difficulty in life. It is, however, important to focus on the positive aspects of filing bankruptcy. If you let this process continue to kick you while you’re down, you won’t be able to complete the other 4 steps to recovery.  

 

A significant majority of people come out of bankruptcy and find themselves more successful and better prepared for the financial road ahead.  If you feel that bankruptcy might be able to help you improve your financial situation please contact us for a free, no obligation consultation so we can show you just how we can help.  The attorneys at Harmon and Gorove have decades of experience in helping people get back on their feet, recover from financial trouble and achieve their goals.  We look forward to helping you!

Protecting Assets From Creditors

Look, we all get it. When we get scared we hide.  It’s a natural reaction to trouble to take the things we value and try to keep them safe. The same thing goes when people you owe money to come calling.  You think about how you can keep those things you’ve worked hard for and value in your possession. Protecting Assets from creditors becomes a top priority.

One of the first reactions is to transfer ownership of your car or house or other items of value you have laying around the house.  You may think about giving certain things away to friends or family. In the end, you’d rather someone you love have it instead of it going to some greedy creditor.  

The only problem with protecting assets this way is that it’s illegal.

People who receive the fraudulent conveyance often get sued by someone, whether its a creditor or a trustee.  These types of transfers have been illegal for at least the last 200 years.  You simply can’t give away your wealth when you owe money to other people. The law is the same whether it’s at the state level or in the bankruptcy code.  Gifts and/or fraudulent conveyances are not effective tools you can use to put your assets beyond the reach of creditors. If you are trying to fraudulently transfer assets, all you’re doing is setting the recipient up to be sued.

You can sell if the price is right.

What all this DOESN’T mean is you can’t sell your assets, it just means that you have to actually sell them for what they’re worth.  For instance, if you have a 2 carat diamond ring, you can’t sell it to your friend Cindy for $50 and if you’re driving a Rolls Royce, you can’t sell it to your Aunt Jean for $1,000.  You have to sell the items for what they’re worth, otherwise it raises serious suspicion. If you sell these items or you fraudulently convey property to someone else, the trustee is allowed to void that sale via a lawsuit.  Generally speaking, the trustee has a period of time called a lookback. Generally that period of time is about 2 years. If you transfer items out of your name during that time period the trustee can sue the person who received your assets and get them back to use to satisfy your debts.


Another problem that can arise in transferring property in a fraudulent way is that you can run afoul of the bankruptcy code.  In 11 U.S.C. 727 the bankruptcy court is allowed to DENY discharge if they find that you made a fraudulent conveyance.  This means you just paid all this money and did all this work and you’re going to get NOTHING in return.

The best way to keep your assets is by filing a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.  You should always resist the urge to hide your assets. The United States Trustee has a great deal of power to look back through your finances through different types of hearings and examinations.  You should ALWAYS consult a competent bankruptcy attorney to find out what your options are and what property is exempt from the trustee’s reach in your bankruptcy. If you have assets with a value that exceeds your exemptions, you should consider a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.  

The attorneys at Harmon and Gorove have decades of experience in protecting assets from creditors.  We work hard to make sure that what YOU have stays YOURS. Contact our office today to set up a free, no obligation consultation to discuss your rights under the Bankruptcy Code.