Cramdown: reducing the principal on secured debts

When considering filing a chapter 13 bankruptcy, you may find yourself in the position to be able to reduce the principal balance of a secured debt to the actual value of the property (car, household item, etc.) it is secured by. When you reduce this amount of debt in this way it is known as a “cramdown” and can be a very valuable tool in your bankruptcy case that can potentially save your automobile, real estate investments, and other personal property you have pledged to secure a debt. Because of the way the law is written, you aren’t allowed to use the cramdown provision on your primary home  but using it in other aspects of your financial life can net massive savings.

When your attorney initiates a cramdown, you’re taking the value of a secured item like a car and reducing the balance you owe in order to match the item’s true book value. When this happens, the crammed down amount is then placed in your unsecured debt in your Chapter 13 case. A cramdown can be extremely beneficial in certain cases and might allow you to pay only a small percentage of your unsecured debt.  Filing things this way could result in all of your unpaid unsecured debt being discharged at the conclusion of your Chapter 13 case. There are many other advantages to cramming down your loans with a Chapter 13. This includes reduced interest rates, the potential to stretch the payments across a greater period of time which might very well reduce monthly payment amounts to a more affordable level. Another fantastic benefit is that you can escape liabilities on any deficiencies by using a mortgage cramdown on investment real estate.

As with much in life, the cramdown in a Chapter 13 seems often seems too good to be true. While this is not the case, it does come with certain guidelines that were passed by Congress to place certain restrictions on how, why and when you can initiate a cramdown. The cramdown restrictions to remember are the 910 Day (roughly two and a half years) Rule on car loans, the One Year Rule on personal property (think TVs, furniture, etc.), and the restrictions on investment real estate mortgages.

The attorneys at Harmon and Gorove are extremely experienced in using cramdowns to the benefit of their clients.  With decades of combined experience, our team can help you find out of you qualify for a cramdown in a Chapter 13 and help you successfully navigate the intricacies of a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy so that you may emerge on the other side debt free.  Call our office today to set up a free consultation with an experienced and compassionate Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Attorney.

Bankruptcy, Foreclosure and the American Dream

During times like this more and more Americans have found themselves to be faced with the prospect of foreclosure or bankruptcy. American society puts a high value on owning a home and for many people it is a source of personal wealth and pride. For the many people who have been through the foreclosure process or filed for bankruptcy protection, being able to purchase a new home and start over again seems like it is an unattainable dream.

There is good news though, recent interviews with people in the housing industry (builders, realtors and lenders) suggest that people who have been through the foreclosure process or have filed for bankruptcy protection are often able to return to homeownership sooner than previously thought.  There are steps to take though in order to attain the dream of homeownership again.

Getting back on track

Foreclosures and bankruptcies often stay on someone’s credit for 7 years or more.  Because of this you must take deliberate steps towards rebuilding your credit as soon as you possibly can.  Consistently making bill payments on time, paying down credit cards, lowering other debt, and avoiding going into additional debt can cause credit scores to be dramatically improved within months of being discharged from bankruptcy or completing the foreclosure process.

Many experts say that many people who work diligently at rebuilding their credit and are save money for down payments are able to buy another home within two to 3 years. Federal Housing Agency (FHA) loans are a frequently used way for previously foreclosed upon homeowners to be able to finance a new home purchase. Many former homeowners who have been through a foreclosure or bankruptcy cannot qualify for conventional mortgages and FHA loans have exploded in popularity amongst people with little credit or damaged credit

Generally speaking, conventional mortgages offer interest rates that are lower than FHA mortgages but conventional mortgages often require a downpayment of 20 percent of the price of the home, a credit score of at least 720 and a proof of income. Comparatively, FHA mortgages, only require credit scores of about 620 and a down payment of 3.5 percent of the home’s purchase price, which makes it much more attractive for lower income people or people with little savings.

FHA loans have drawbacks. In addition to higher interest rates, FHA mortgages are subject to a mandatory insurance premium of 1.75 percent of the loan. While this sounds like a lot more money up front, often, these costs can be rolled into the total amount of the loan. Additionally, payments of 1.25 percent of the outstanding balance are required of the homebuyer each year. Many Americans find that FHA loans are a more affordable option despite these drawbacks.

FHA mortgages are not the only available option for homebuyers. Many former homeowners eligible for first-time homebuyer programs and if you qualify for Veterans benefits, you might qualify for a mortgage under the VA. These different programs help buyers to make the down payment and handle the closing costs of the loans. Generally speaking, programs like this are available to homeowners who have not owned a home within the previous three years.

A competent Attorney can help

If filing for bankruptcy is something you’re considering or you find yourself  threatened with a foreclosure it can feel like your world is collapsing around you. We cannot state more emphatically that this is not the case. The experienced bankruptcy attorneys of Harmon and Gorove can explain the bankruptcy and/or foreclosure process and advise you on how it will affect your financial situation. Armed with facts, expert analysis and years of experience our team can recommend the best debt-relief option for your particular situation. With the planning, guidance and the expertise of our team your dream of owning a home again can once more become a reality.

 

What is foreclosure and what does it mean?

Foreclosure essentially means the process of repossessing real estate that the mortgage has fallen behind on to the point where the lender has reason to believe that you will be unable to catch back up.  Banks that complete the foreclosure process will list the home for sale in order to recover some or all of the money the bank lost on the original transaction. In the event that the bank has listed the home in the Multiple Listing Service, then the home can be put up for sale and the foreclosure process is complete.

There are three stages of the foreclosure process:

  • Pre-foreclosure: at this point the bank files a notice for lack of payment. This is generally when the homeowner falls behind two months in the payments. The owner will generally be afforded a period of between two and three months to attempt to refinance the loan or sell the property on short sale.
  • Auction: At this point the bank has set up an auction on the courthouse steps (a legal step in the foreclosure process in Georgia) in a bid to sell the home and recover its costs.
  • Bank owning: in the event that the home was not successfully sold at the auction, the lien holders have two options. The first option is being paid off by private mortgage insurance and the other option is that they can take a loss on the investment.

If successful, foreclosures can have a number of financial consequences for the former homeowner depending on the agreements that were in the loan agreement that you signed when you purchased the home. The most significant consequence is that the homeowner loses the home, is evicted and loses all the equity you have built up in the home. You could also be sued for any amount the lender does not recover in the sale of your home and you could also potentially face tax consequences with your state and the federal government. It is extremely important that a person knows their rights in the foreclosure process.

If you are experiencing a potential foreclosure call the experienced attorneys at Harmon and Gorove and schedule a free consultation with a dedicated attorney who can help you navigate the foreclosure process and potentially save your home and stop the process of foreclosure.  We have helped thousands of people save their homes, come let us see what we can do for you.